Box, box, pliers ...

What we call a cigar is a pleasure accessory that is formed as a result of bringing tobacco leaves together, wrapping them and making them smokable, giving a lot of pleasure and should not be rushed to smoke. Here I have spelled the word "hugs" in oblique, because when something is wrapped, it forms a cylindrical shape for us, even though it is crooked. Do you remember eating a square doner wrap? Well, what are these angular cigars that we come across all the time?

In fact, there is no exact information about where these square cigars came from. Some sources say that the cornering was started to prevent cigars from rolling and falling off the table, while other sources said it was done to save space in packaging. Whatever the reason for its release, one cannot help but wonder if there is a difference between a normal winding cigar and another. If we exclude the normal winding and box-pressed varieties of the Davidoff Nicaragua series, the reason for this is that in the box-pressed one, not only the shape but also the tobacco used changes, there are some differences between the smokers - the accuracy and the wrongness can be argued - between these two styles. So what are these?

To understand these, let's take a look at how to box-press. There are generally two types of box-pressed. The first is the box-pressed cigars, which are also referred to as the old Cuban style, which are obtained by putting the cigars in cedar boxes, then putting these boxes on top of a mold press and compressing them at a certain rate and keeping them there for a while. These cigars, after leaving the box, usually get rounded after a while. The second method is the method of compressing each cigar's edge by rotating it between straight wooden bars, like a ruler, at certain time intervals. For example, Davidoff Nicaragua Box-pressed cigars are made this way. Of course, with this method, the edges and corners of the cigars become more defined and stay the same.

Tobacco, the same tobacco, the same winding until the end point, what is the difference. As I said, some smokers believe there is a difference. They explain this difference as follows. The aroma and flavor of the cigar becomes more intense and beautiful in certain blends, although not in every blend, due to the fact that the pressed tobacco is more in contact with each other. However, due to the tightness of the leaves, the burning becomes more precise and clear. Others just mention that they have more pleasure while holding it. As I said, these advantages are somewhat open to discussion, if you ask me. I personally did not experience an obvious difference in this way. On the contrary, it is a little difficult for me to smoke box-pressed. I can't rotate it so easily between my fingers, I try to match the long edge while putting it in the ashtray. So, the truth is, I don't go too far with box-pressed cigars. But that doesn't mean that there are no fabulous cigars between box-presses either. For example AJ Fernandez or Padron have incredibly beautiful box-pressed cigars.

I mean, it's a bit of a preference here, and when you're really smoking, can you detect any difference like the one I mentioned above, she's looking at it. What would you say?

 

Enjoyable smoking ...