Indonesian Tobacco

Besuki, the first of the two types of Indonesia, which has grown mainly tobacco for cigarettes since the 1700s and grows in the southern part of Jember, is used as a wrapper, while the second, Sumatra , can be used as a filling and vineyard leaf alongside the wrapper leaf.

Besuki was the name given to tobacco that was originally grown in the East Java region. Unfortunately, this genre has lost its popularity over time. These leaves are divided into VO (early harvest) and NO (late harvest) types. The reason for its loss of popularity is that in a very small area, a small amount of quality dressing leaves can be grown and the quality is often variable. Today, the majority of tobacco grown is still used for cigarette production.

Today, Sumatran tobacco, which is also grown in the Dominican Republic, Honduras and Nicaragua and comes from the Indonesian island of Sumatra, can be used for very high quality wrapping leaves. However, due to its inadequacy, it is mainly stored for cigarette production in Europe.

Cigars that we encounter in small amounts in cigars and use the tobacco of this region are dark and aromatic. With their slightly bitter taste, they are loved by some, but not preferred by others.